Berchem - Stolpersteine

Information: Wikipedia

A Stolperstein literally "stumbling stone", metaphorically a "stumbling block" is a sett-size, 10 by 10 centimetres (3.9 in × 3.9 in) concrete cube bearing a brass plate inscribed with the name and life dates of victims of Nazi extermination or persecution.

 

The Stolpersteine project, initiated by the German artist Gunter Demnig in 1992, aims to commemorate individuals at exactly the last place of residency—or, sometimes, work—which was freely chosen by the person before he or she fell victim to Nazi terror, euthanasia, eugenics, was deported to a concentration or extermination camp, or escaped persecution by emigration or suicide. As of 29 March 2018, over 67,000 Stolpersteine have been laid in 22 countries, making the Stolpersteine project the world's largest decentralized memorial.

 

The majority of Stolpersteine commemorate Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Others have been placed for Sinti and Romani people (then also called "gypsies"), homosexuals, the physically or mentally disabled, Jehovah's Witnesses, black people, members of the Communist Party, the Social Democratic Party, and the anti-Nazi Resistance, the Christian opposition (both Protestants and Catholics), and Freemasons, along with International Brigade soldiers in the Spanish Civil War, military deserters, conscientious objectors, escape helpers, capitulators, "habitual criminals", looters, and others charged with treason, military disobedience, or undermining the Nazi military, as well as Allied soldiers.

 

Tuesday 5 March 2019, Gunter Demnig, the German artists and creator of the Stolpersteine, was in Antwerp to lay 26 stones with the names of victims of Nazism.

 

List of Stolpersteine in the district of Berchem

Generaal Capiaumontstraat 37: LACE TENNENBAUM

Pretoriastraat 30: EMILE ZUCKERBERG

Uitbreidingsstraat 564: VIGDOR GETZEL HOLLANDER


Generaal Capiaumontstraat 37

hier woonde

LACE TENNENBAUM

geb. 1878

gearresteerd 9.1943

gedeporteerd 1943 UIT

Drancy

vermoord

Auschwitz

Generaal Capiaumontstraat 37

here lived

LACE TENNENBAUM

born 1878

arrested 9.1943

deported 1943 UIT

Drancy

murdered

Auschwitz


Pretoriastraat 30

hier woonde

EMILE ZUCKERBERG

geb. 1938

aangehouden 6.4.1944

Izieu

gevangen Montluc, Drancy

weggevoerd 15.4.1944

vermoord

Auschwitz

Pretoriastraat 30

here lived

EMILE ZUCKERBERG

born 1938

arrested 6.4.1944

Izieu

imprisoned Montluc, Drancy

deported 15.4.1944

murdered

Auschwitz


Uitbreidingsstraat 564

hier woonde

VIGDOR GETZEL

HOLLANDER

geb. 1887

gearresteerd 12.9.1942

hechtenis Mechelen

gedeporteerd 1942

Auschwitz

vermoord

Uitbreidingsstraat 564

here lived

VIGDOR GETZEL

HOLLANDER

born 1887

arrested 12.9.1942

detention Mechelen

deported 1942

Auschwitz

murdered

Vigdor Getsel (Victor) Hollander was born in Neu-Sandez, Austro-Hungarian empire, now Nowy Sacz in Poland, on 20 April 1887.  He became a diamond trader and, in November 1909, emigrated to Belgium, where he settled in Antwerp.

 

On 1st December 1909, he married Terez Eckstein, born in Moskolizi, Hungary, on 14 September 1888. Their oldest son, Mauritz Leo Hollander, was born in Antwerp on 16 December 1909. Three more boys followed : Marcel (b. 31/05/1912), Julius (b. 31/01/1915) and Ezriel Nathum (b. 29/06/1924).

 

In August 1914, while visiting Vigdor Getsel Hollander’s parents in Scheveningen, Germany invaded Belgium. For the duration of the First World War, the Hollander family remained in the Netherlands, where third son Julius was born. In 1919 they returned to Antwerp, where oldest son Mauritz Leo Hollander passed away on 26 September 1922.

 

On 11 and 12 September 1942, the Nazis organised a big anti-Jewish raid in Antwerp. Among the hundreds of people that were arrested was also Vigdor Getzel Hollander. He did not survive deportation from the Dossin barracks to Auschwitz-Birkenau via Transport X on 15 September 1942.

 

His wife, Terez Eckstein, survived the war hiding in Antwerp with her mother and emigrated to Israel in 1949. During the Second World War, Marcel found refuge in Latin-America and then joined the Belgian armed forces in Canada. Post-war he emigrated to the USA. Julius and his brother Ezriel (alias Pino) lived in London during the war. They post-war returned to Belgium after which Julius also migrated to Israël. Ezriel returned to Antwerp and married Louise Rachel Götz in 1949.